hi.

turkeyinacan:

shoutout to people working weekends and overnights and overtime, people working in hospitality and retail and food service, who are sacrificing time with their loved ones, so fuckers with weekday desk jobs get to live comfortably with the amenities we provide while simultaneously shitting all over us for not getting “real jobs”

(via murderwhitepeople)

theracismrepellent:

caprediem:

fuckyoulosersinthephotag:

HEADLINE: ANNOYING PALEFACEBAGOFPISS TAKES A PUBLIC SHIT ON VIETNAMESE CULTURE BY USING ANGEL HAIR PASTA IN HER “PHOE” WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY MOCKING “ASIAN” ACCENTS

allow me to share some precious gems from her recipe:

  • literally the only ingredients of the soup part are: 1. chicken broth 2. ginger and 3. garlic. THAT’S IT. like. she didn’t even use ANY spices??
  • - -??? how do you call this pho if you don’t use pho spices. they are essential. ESSENTIAL. that is what makes it taste and smell like pho. it is 100% necessary, 100% non-negotiable
  • "1/2 pound angel hair pasta" i’m too tired for this shit
  • basil leaves? you’ve gotta specify thai basil (or la hue) or your white audience is gonna go home and make fucking italian ass basily angel hair pasta spaghetti drowned in chicken broth
  • lime zest.. chill rachael
  • braised.pork.shoulder. in pho. shredded pork. in pho.

DON’T watch the video if you don’t want to end up throwing your computer in the trash. a selective summary:

  • repeatedly butchers the pronunciation of pho, calls it “phoe” at least 6 times, shamelessly
  • when she explains what the hot sauce is she puts on a mocking asian accent and says “SRIRACHAAA” WITH THAT BUCKTEETH FUCKING CHINAMAN THING PPL DO
  • "Trust me, if you’ve never tried it, it’s so easy to make a big beautiful bowl of PHOE. And it’d be so much fun for your kids or your friends. You can entertain with it. I like to put chopsticks in it and serve it with a slurpy soup spoon along side."
  • —no. it shouldn’t be easy unless you’ve been making it for a long time. it should NOT be easy if you’re someone that CANT EVEN PRONOUNCE THE NAME OF THE THING YOU’RE MAKING ON NATIONAL TELEVISION.
  • —even for my MOM, MY VIETNAMESE MOTHER BORN AND RAISED IN VIETNAM, it’s still a whole lot of work!!! i have been studying and practicing making it for years now and it still takes me DAYS to make. D A Y S
  • —“I like to put chopsticks in it” oh do you? that’s just your preference? weird coincidence. huh
  • —slurpy spoon
  • —“You can entertain with it” “it’d be so much fun for your kids or your friends.” LISTEN WHITEY. YOU DON’T JUST GO AROUND BRINGING HOME PARTS OF OTHER PPL’S CULTURES TO ENTERTAIN YOUR BRAT CHILDREN AND UGLYPALE FRIENDS WITH. OOOOO THE ORIENT. HOW FASCINATING. LOOK AT THIS WEIRD SHIT THOSE CHINKS EAT HAHAHA WOW SO WEIRD SO ORIENTAL

(thanks to @sweetheartpleasestay for tipping us off on this)

wtf

I’m going to throw up, THIS is appropriation of cultural foods okay guys?
-Jack

(via whitepeoplestealingculture)

detrea:

The premise of minimum wage, when it was introduced, was that a single wage earner should be able to own a home and support a family.  That was what it was based on; a full time job, any job, should be able to accomplish this.

The fact people scoff at this idea if presented nowadays, as though the people that ring up your groceries or hand you your burgers don’t deserve the luxury of a home and a family, is disgusting.

(via murderwhitepeople)

mrsthirdward:

The Queen of Rap slaying with Queen Bey. ***Flawless

I’m so not used to seeing bey on stage with anyone but dc and Jay, but her and nicki flow so well and are so cute together on stage, I love it.

(Source: arrtpop, via pomegranate-poet)

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

(via pomegranate-poet)